A Motorcyclist’s Dream: Google Glass in Helmet Form


Would you buy something like this?

Reality-motorcycle-helmet

Samantha-murphy

By Samantha Murphy
Using high-tech dashboards, drivers can reference navigation systems and voice control in the comfort of a quiet car, but motorcyclists still don’t have an effective, high-tech solution. Referencing maps requires a roadside stop, and GPS systems can be distracting.Now, the team at LiveMap is looking to fund a project that would bring built-in navigation and augmented reality to helmets. Think Google Glass in helmet form.The motorycle helmet, which is currently listed on crowdfunding site Indiegogo, comes with technology and features so powerful only fighter pilots currently have access. The project already has the financial backing and support from the Moscow Department of Science and several other Russian organizations, but LiveMap is looking for additional funding to get it up and running.Similar to F-35 fighter jet helmets, a colorful, translucent picture would project onto the visor and create a clear, unobstructed view. It would come with its own interface — not iOS or Android — and prevent users from watching videos or playing games while riding.

For long drives, the motorcycle helmet features two 3000-mAh batteries, a microphone for voice control that keeps both hands focused on driving and a digital compass for head movement tracking. In case a motorcyclist runs into trouble, the command “help” will notify local authorities.

LiveMap plans to ship the helmet in August 2014, with a price tag of $1,500 for devices purchased in June and $2000 for those purchased afterward. If you don’t want to fully invest in the technology but still want to give it a try, you can donate $100 to the fund to try on a head set at an upcoming LiveMap promo party in the future.

Helmet

Images via LiveMap

One thought on “A Motorcyclist’s Dream: Google Glass in Helmet Form

  1. Doing a little digging around the internet, it’s interesting (or amazingly boring) to read people’s comments which are unsurprisingly predominately negative, of course, since human beings in general are incredibly resistant to change of any sort. Comments such as “The last thing people need are more distractions…” or “This is for people who have no life other than buying technological gadgets” come to mind. It’s like the whole ABS on bikes debate all over again, as ABS became commonplace in the market during the 00s. Or the Mac/PC/Linux wars of the 90s and 00s. It is ingrained in our nature to have a tendency toward one-upmanship. So a bit of filtering is required to form an opinion.

    This technology has been proven for quite some time in everything from planes to BMWs to Buicks and the idea is certainly sound—keep the operator’s eyes ahead and present the important information so it appears as though it’s sitting on the horizon. We are so accustomed to looking down for information in cars and bikes that it seems unnatural at first but once this technology is everywhere people will wonder how we survived, recklessly diverting our gaze to look at our speedometers and GPS devices. And further down the road, people will find it horrifying that we actually took direct control of machines which could potentially kill us or others in the wrong hands.

    To have my speed, RPM, fuel level, directions and crossroad names translucently superimposed in my field of vision would seem a huge advance in safety to me. Or one step further, once the technology matures, having full night vision capabilities (think Arnie in Terminator 2) to better judge corners and see people/animals far ahead beyond the headlamp beams.

    While I think this is a good start, I won’t be shelling out $2k for first generation technology, but within our lifetimes I think we’ll wonder how we did without a bit of augmented reality.

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