BATTLE OF THE ADVENTURE BIKES: COMPARISON TEST


Does Suzuki’s affordable new V-Strom 1000 have a chance against the BMW R1200GS

and KTM 1190 Adventure?

Adventure Bike Comparison group action shot

When the R80 G/S was introduced in 1981, no one at BMW realized the full impact of what they had just done. We now think of that first G/S as the original adventure bike, but that term was not coined for quite a few years. Instead, most people back then had no idea why BMWwould produce a large, heavy, shaft-drive, on- and off-road opposed twin in an era of lightweight, single-cylinder dual-purpose bikes. But enthusiasts eventually “got it,” and other manufacturers soon cashed in on the allure of exploring the world on big, powerful two-wheelers.

Since their one-bike origin, adventure motorcycles have evolved to levels of sophistication no one 33 years ago could have imagined. These three bikes—BMW’s R1200GS, KTM’s 1190 Adventure, and Suzuki’s V-Strom 1000 ABS—epitomize that progress with modern style, outstanding comfort, brilliant performance, and unmatched versatility.

And what terrific motorcycles they are! The 2014 R1200GS, the direct descendant of that ’81 R80 G/S, glides down the road to the soothing thrum of its 1,170cc twin, the first liquid-cooled Boxer motor ever. Bags of torque lurk in reserve, making the bike sneaky fast and always ready to push the 525-pound GS forward at an impressive rate at any rpm and in any gear.

2014 BMW R1200GS static side view

UPS DOWNS
BMW R1200GS
  • Highly refined all around
  • Shaft drive = no chain maintenance
  • Better tourer than some tourers
  • Footpegs a bit far to the rear
  • Electronics controls could be more intuitive
  • $$$ with all the optional electronics

Its ride and handling qualities are pretty much what you want them to be. That’s the result of the optional Dynamic ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment), ASC traction control, adjustable riding modes, and ABS, all of which influence each other depending upon the setting the rider chooses. Match all that with a beautifully contoured and padded seat, and you have the industry’s most comfortable adventurer, reflecting BMW’s decades of experience building top-flight touring bikes.

While the BMW impresses with its finesse, the 1,195cc KTM is a 129-hp V-twin wildcat that wheelies in the first three or four gears, burns the quarter-mile in 10.62 seconds at 130 mph, hits a top speed of 151 mph, and fires from corner to corner on back roads like it has a rocket stuck up its tail. If the GS serves up its power with a magnum of champagne on a silver platter, the Adventure does it with a bottle of Bud slid down the bar. For certain, it is very refined, but in its own uncompromising, “let’s get it on” way.

Like the GS, the 1190 has a full suite of electronic suspension, traction control, power delivery, and ABS rider aids; but while the BMW’s are optional, the Katoom’s are standard. They also engage in a lot of cross-talk, allowing you to tune those performance factors over a sufficiently wide range to cope with anything you might encounter. Plus, the ABS is lean-sensitive, adjusting the antilock dependent upon how fast and far the 1190 is banked over in a corner.

2014 KTM 1190 Adventure static side view

UPS DOWNS
KTM 1190 Adventure
  • Electronic rider aids are standard
  • Does everything exceptionally well
  • Baaaad fast!
  • Engine mechanically noisy
  • Awkward, two-hand windscreen adjustment
  • Nosebleed seat height

Meanwhile, the V-Strom splits the difference between the other two—not as polished as the BMW, not as raucous as the KTM, and sans as many electronic aids as either. It’s a solid, legitimate adventure bike that never gets embarrassed by the other two, despite being priced several thou lower and having the smallest (1,037cc) engine. The 90-degree V-twin is smooth, torquey, and responsive, and its quarter-mile performance is only half a second and about 7 mph behind the BMW’s; even its top-gear roll-ons are just fractions of a second slower.

Because the ’Strom has an excellent chassis and is lighter and lower than the others, it handles beautifully. The 468-pound (dry) 1000 devours back-road corners like that was its dedicated purpose, yet it’s rock-steady on straightaways.

Okay, but how did these bikes play the adventure game in the dirt?

Pretty damned well, considering that they all are quarter-ton motorcycles riding on knobless street tires. We never tackled gnarly, rutted, rocky climbs, since that’s not what these bikes are intended to conquer in their existing configurations; we instead stayed on dirt roads, narrow trails, and gravel-strewn two-tracks. Only deep sand gave them any trouble, again, mostly due to their tires.

Perhaps the biggest surprise was the Suzuki. With its traction control either turned off or on the least sensitive of its three settings, the V-Strom churned through the aforementioned with no trouble whatsoever. The fork digested everything we bounced over without a hiccup, and the shock only bottomed on some of the whoops. You can’t turn off the ABS, so we had to be mindful of that when braking on slick terrain.

2014 Suzuki V-Strom 1000 ABS static side view

UPS DOWNS
Suzuki V-Strom 1000 ABS
  • Most-affordable big adventure bike
  • Bright, dark-piercing headlight
  • Comfortable ergonomics
  • No ABS Off switch
  • No centerstand
  • Desperately seeking skid plate

So, too, was the BMW impressive off-road, considering its greater weight, shaft drive, and two big cylinders poking out like fat outriggers. Its smooth, linear torque was easy to modulate in riding mode’s Enduro setting, and the low center of gravity provided by the opposed-twin layout helped disguise the GS’s mass. We were a little disappointed with the previous R1200GS’s suspension, but the new bike’s Telelever fork and Paralever rear combination—together with a new stering damper for 2014—is vastly improved.

Which brings us to the KTM. Once you quit the tarmac and hit the dirt, the 1190 morphs from a take-no-prisoners streetbike to an ass-kicking dirt bike. In agility, stability, balance, steering, suspension, and adjustable power delivery, the KTM was this test’s off-road class act. It was less bothered by rocks, ruts, and other trail obstacles, and even coped with the sand a little better. With the traction control in the Offroad position, the ABS even allows rear-wheel skidding while still applying antilock to the front brake.

Actually, the 1190’s stellar dirt manners should have come as no surprise. KTM has been building championship-caliber off-road machinery for decades, and that know-how has translated directly to the 1190. Whether off-road or on, it was the most capable, most confidence-inspiring, and most fun of the trio. The R1200GS is the best overall streetbike, the Suzuki the best bang-for-buck. But when you consider the KTM’s advantages in almost every area of performance—plus, its standard MSRP gets you all the electronic rider aids at about the same price as the BMW without such equipment—the outcome here is a slam dunk.

In the March issue of Cycle World, we stated that the KTM 1190 might be the best all-around bike in the world. We still believe that but with a small word change: Replace “might be” with “is.”

SPECIFICATIONS
BMW R1200GS KTM 1190 Adventure Suzuki V-Strom 1000 ABS
PRICE $19,520 $17,834 $12,699
DRY WEIGHT 520 lb. 490 lb. 474 lb.
WHEELBASE 59.2 in. 61.2 in. 61.4 in.
SEAT HEIGHT 33.9/34.6 in. 34.3/35.0 in. 33.4 in.
FUEL MILEAGE 37 mpg 35 mpg 36 mpg
0-60 MPH 2.9 sec. 2.8 sec. 3.1 sec.
1/4 MILE 11.07 sec. @ 119.44 mph 10.62 sec. @ 129.70 mph 11.60 sec. @ 112.82 mph
HORSEPOWER 116.5 hp @ 7900 rpm 128.8 hp @ 9360 rpm 91.1 hp @ 8240 rpm
TORQUE 84.0 lb.-ft. @ 6260 rpm 81.3 lb.-ft. @ 7670 rpm 67.4 lb.-ft. @ 3980 rpm
TOP SPEED 137 mph 151 mph 126 mph

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Building a Water-Cooled BMW R1200GS


I think I am just not your normal grrl…because this to me is beauty and I would want it in my bedroom! ;-)  EYE Candy for sure!
Friday, 10 May 2013 03:56 Justin Coffey

There’s no doubt that BMW’s new water-cooled R1200GS is a capable adventure touring motorcycle. With 125hp, spoked-wheels, dynamic suspension, cruise control and an assortment of other options, the new GS is everything we expected it to be, and then some. But there’s always some room for improvement. Luggage and protection items are an easy upgrade and will transform the R1200GS from adequate to extraordinary.  Touratech’s Zega Pro pannier systems provides safe and secure storage, both on and off the bike, while crash bars and an Expedition skid plate protect the most important part of any motorcycle, the power-plant. Additional accessories, such as a stainless steel headlight guard and radiator guards will keep road debris from damaging important parts, while a larger sidestand foot will keep the R1200GS upright in everything from soft sand to loose gravel.  Continue reading

Extreme adventure test – part two


We took the BMW R1200GS, Yamaha XT1200Z Super Tenere, Triumph Tiger Explorer 1200 and KTM 990 Adventure on an off-road adventure and to really test their abilities, we enlisted Stan Watt, who finished 34th in this year’s Dakar Rally.

View part one here: http://youtu.be/umHWLA8X2ik

Get all the latest news att http://www.motorcyclenews.com

‘Adventure Riding’


There has been a lot of talk recently about what the term ‘Adventure Riding’ really means. Is it blasting down a gravel highway on a fully loaded 1200cc motorcycle? Doing single track on a light enduro style motorcycle with nothing but a backpack? Or is it riding two-up with everything you own, ready to take on the next continent? We feel adventure riding is a way to exercise your creativity. It can be whatever you want it to be. So don’t let anyone tell you differently.

Triumph Tiger Explorer review


Kevin Ash

Paul Barshon, Alessio Barbanti, Patrick Gosling (click on images)

HOW do you turn the ABS off on this bike?  Is there a switch or do you have to manually do it?  ANYONE KNOW?

Some reviews are just too wordy and this one is no different.  But if you read it you will get the idea. We still do not like the luggage set up for these bikes…bikes meaning the Tiger 800.  The mount comes off the Sprint ST and moves with the bike.  Luggage mount is plastic as well.  When you buy one of these bikes really have a good look at the mounts for the Triumph luggage.  If you are going to go off road and you know we are all bound to have our bikes lay down to sleep…think to yourself….will this set up, will the mounts survive a dump?

Triumph_Explorer_01

It’s rare enough for to any manufacturer to admit its new adventure bike is a rival for BMW, even when that’s stating the very obvious. But Triumph has gone a step further, it’s not only said the R1200GS is in its sights, we’ve been told some rather more contentious stuff about the German bike…

You have to applaud Triumph’s directness, first simply for naming the GS as the Tiger Explorer’s benchmark and rival, where others shy away or try to wriggle out of any conflict. Then the oft-reported weakness of the GS’s shaft drive was homed in on by Triumph in descriptions of its own shaft, in language which you don’t have to boil down

very far to end up with: our shaft drive is reliable where the GS’s isn’t.

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Buyer’s guide for BMW


BMW makes “sexy” looking bikes…from a grrls perspective  ;-) Click on the pics!

2012 Bikes

A twin-cylinder maxi-scooter with “flexible” underseat storage.

A travel-friendly maxi-scooter equipped with a twin-cylinder engine and ABS. Continue reading

BMW R1200GS vs. KTM 990 Adventure vs. Yamaha Super Tenere – Comparison Test


CYCLE WORLD CLAIMS THE YAMAHA TENERE THE WINNER?  FOR THOSE WHO RIDE THE BIG ADV BIKES DO YOU AGREE?  WE ARE STILL IN THE 800CC BIKES SO WE REALLY DO NOT KNOW.
February 7, 2012 By

A new player in the big-bore adventure-touring segment makes things

interesting.

BMW R1200GS vs. KTM 990 Adventure vs. Yamaha Super Tenere - Comparison Test

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Ohlins Mechatronic: Making Suspension Smarter


By Tom Roderick, Jan. 12, 2012, Photography by Ohlins

BMW spearheaded the Electronically Controlled (EC) suspension revolution on production motorcycles by introducing its ESA system in 2005, followed by ESA II in 2008. During this period there’s been no alternative to the stock system. Öhlins is changing that with its Mechatronic EC suspension now available for any BMW R1200GS outfitted with ESA II.

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