Touring Tip: Risk of Winter Riding


Be Aware and be smart

Jan 10, 2014  by

Touring Tip: Risk of Winter Riding

We’ve recently been caught in the grip of a particularly cold blast of winter weather. So it bears repeating, from a previous Touring Tip, some of the additional risks of riding in cold weather. Here are seven worth keeping in mind: Continue reading

What The Latest NHTSA Motorcycle Data Reveals


To carry on the helmet discussion here are some stats that are alarming…

November 18, 2013

By

motorcycle-accident

For the third consecutive year, the number of U.S. motorcycle fatalities has risen again with 4,957 riders having been killed on the roads in 2012 according the latest report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Continue reading

Yet Another Helmet Regulatory Article – Where do you stand?


Federal Government Weighs National Helmet Law

Federal helmet laws are coming

Cheryl and I are all for ATGATT….where so you stand?  This topic always is a HOT one and pushes so many buttons…

In a controversial move, a federal task force is set to recommend a sweeping, nationwide mandatory helmet law for all motorcyclists, according to a spokesman for the AMA. The legislation for a national helmet law would be aimed at reducing injuries and deaths, and their concurrent economic impact.

Presently, states set their own helmet laws. In recent years, the trend has been to lift mandatory helmet laws or restrict enforcement to minors. Mandatory helmet use is required by all motorcyclists in 19 states; 27 states have an age requirement; two states have age and insurance requirements, and two states have no restrictions, according to the lobby group, BikersRights.com. Continue reading

QUICK TIPS: Should You Ride A Motorcycle ?


IMG_0003

Riding a motorcycle is a unique experience. Riding is fun and invigorating, yet the skills needed for safe riding, combined with the lack of car-like crash protection on a motorcycle, can cast doubts on whether a person should choose to ride a motorcycle. Some potential riders lack the ability to execute skilled and timely actions in a complex traffic environment; others lack keen judgment or don’t have a firm grasp of the concept of risk management. Continue reading

More Safety Advise from Someone Who Crashed


10 Things I’ve Learned From 10 Motorcycle Crashes

October 25, 2013

By

Motorcycle Crash

I’ve had a few motorcycle crashes in my time. Some have hurt me, some I’ve walked away from. I’d like to think each one has made me a smarter, safer rider. Hopefully, by sharing what I’ve learned, you can be too, without all the exposed butt shots on the Internet. This is 10 things I’ve learned from 10 (or so) motorcycle crashes. Continue reading

Motorcycle Cornering Clearance – What To Do When It Runs Out


Once again another great article giving some good advise when out riding.  Corning is so important and at least knowing what can be expected could save you from that OMG freaking out moment.  Nothing is a guarantee but awareness is priceless.  Even on ADV bikes this can happen.

SOURCE:  Motorcycle.com

Strategies for safely handling corners when hard parts touch ground

How To: Be an Expert at Commuting on a Motorcycle


Riding in Vancouver, BC almost 365 days a year we can agree that this article gives a great advise to being a successful commuter.  We always have waterproof gloves with us but even H20 proof gloves can pack it in on some days.  Back up gloves can save a life..we bring sometimes up to three sets of gloves.  Hippo Hands are also a fantastic way to stay warm and dry…I know they are not beautiful but oh so practical…

October 10, 2013

By

commuter-2

Commuting by bike saves you time and money and is also more effective than a cup of coffee to wake you up in the morning. Use these tips to get the most of your trip to and from work, this is how to commute on a motorcycle.

Gear Up
Commuting to work requires you to ride in a myriad of different weather conditions. Even in a climate as mellow as Southern California, my commute ranges from dark, low 40-degree mornings to sunny, 95-degree afternoon rides depending on the time of year. Varied conditions mean you’ll need appropriate gear for all types of weather. We recommend the Aerostich Roadcrafter riding suit, as it can be made to fit all weather conditions and can be worn over anything. As a bonus, it’s been specifically designed to avoid wrinkling a business suit worn underneath. But, if you aren’t able to spring for that, a good winter jacket and gloves could do the trick. You can also add the following as needed: Continue reading

Touring Tip: Know Your Riding Risk Factors


I think everyone should save this article as a reminder how important it is for all of us to take stock in our bike, our minds and everything that is said below regarding being safe.  Never take for granted riding anywhere even if it’s around the corner to a store.  Don’t be paranoid but be aware….and be safe out there.
Oct 04, 2013 by

Touring Tip: Know Your Riding Risk Factors

There are some similarities between the causes of plane crashes and the reasons for motorcycle accidents: it’s often a combination of factors, or risks, that cause incidents in both cases. And in both, the fundamental cause can usually be traced back to “human error.” Just as in doing a preflight check before flying your own airplane, a motorcyclist should take stock of his or her risk factors before their ride. Unlike the airline industry, which has many rules, regulations, and certifications in place to help prevent accidents, the motorcycle rider is pretty much on their own.

The Venn diagram below shows one way of thinking about four fundamental categories of rider risk and how they can overlap to create even higher levels of accident risk to riders.Touring Tip: Know Your Riding Risk Factors

The Four Rs For Evaluating Motorcycle Riding Risk Continue reading

Extreme Road Rash: Cause, Effect, and Lesson Learned


Powerful story about lessons learned….

SOURCE: FRZOnline WIKI

One Year Has Passed

It’s hard to look in the mirror and think that my scars are already an entire year old. Touching my stomach and rib cage, I can’t imagine looking this way and feeling this pain for the rest of my life. I still feel as if at any moment I will wake up from this terrible dream and be comfortable in my own skin once again. Knowing that it’s real, that there is nothing I can do to change it, I am reminded of my mistakes every minute of everyday. I am also reminded how lucky I am to be alive as I close my eyes and remember why I still feel pain after an entire year of healing. Imagining that if I had not survived the accident, I wouldn’t have anything to touch at all, I smile when my fingers run over a thick layer of scar tissue in place of my once soft skin. I know my life has a purpose, and I strive everyday to live up to the task that has been placed at my feet.

The Accident

It was a beautiful Sunday morning even through my blurred vision. I was on the back of my friend Shaun’s GSXR 750 and was excited to be on a sport bike, even if it was as a passenger, after a long streak of no riding whatsoever. I had shed my prescription glasses for a pair of sunglasses, my cowboy hat for an oversized helmet, and quickly thrown on a pair of capri jeans, tennis shoes, and a sweatshirt over my bikini. I thought nothing of the fact that I had practically no protection against the asphalt if anything were to happen. I figured that we couldn’t get into a wreck; it simply wouldn’t happen to me. It’s amazing how fast life came at me that day.

Approaching mile marker seven on highway 550, I noticed that I had to start fighting the wind to stay behind Shaun without pulling on him too much. I placed my hands on the gas tank and pushed myself into him as much as possible without crowding him. As we came around to the right and went down the hill, we kept accelerating. I was scared, but thought I could handle the force of the wind as it suddenly picked up much more than in the moments before. I started to slide back on the seat and felt the cool air fill the small space between my chest and Shaun’s back. Continue reading

Motorcycle Safety: Think! Don’t ride too fast


Comments???? There are three videos in one…second video is the Transport for London advertisement about motorcycle safety.

A Transport for London (TfL) advert promoting motorcycle safety.

For more information visit our website:
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/roadsafety
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/proje…

Transcript:
I could be at home now, watching telly with the kids. Well I was thinking about going for a pint, instead I’ve punctured my lung and it’s slowly filling up with blood. I’m going into cardiac arrest now. Silly place to overtake really. Still you live and learn, don’t you?

Night Riding


Important safety tips!

How to see and be seen when the sun goes down

Jeff Cobb Apr. 12, 2013

As it is, some riders avoid the night because unless extra steps are taken, it is usually harder to see and be seen. What’s more, in many regions splattering bugs can be an issue, as can deer or other nocturnal animals. And if you crash in the middle of nowhere, well, that could be a bad scenario, no doubt.

But this said, many commuters wind up riding in the dark of the early morning or after the sun has gone down, or both. And many others may finish a day of riding after sundown. So, if you expect to ride in the dark, you’d be well advised to assess your equipment and decide whether it is really all you need it to be.

 

And even once you are satisfied with your setup, you will still want to ride within limits. Continue reading

Road Conditions Quiz


Please feel free to post how well you did or not on this quiz….we are curious ;-)

Riding a motorcycle safely and in control means not just better bike handling; it also means judging road conditions.

No matter what your experience level, riding on busy roads – which often have poor surfaces – can challenge any rider.

According to the Motorcycle Safety Foundation and other instructors, the best attitude to adopt is to become a “life long learner.” Enrolling in a rider’s class from time to time, as well as proactive self-learning are healthy continuing education habits to get into.

With experience, riders learn the importance of scanning the road, and they develop greater awareness of conditions as they ride, including ability to estimate traction, which has been described as “reading” types of pavement. Continue reading

The Truth about Drinking and Riding


Some sobering statistics on a dangerous problem

SOURCE:  MOTORCYCLE.COM

Jeff Cobb Mar. 22, 2013

While no one will publicly declare alcohol consumption and motorcycling are OK, there remain definite problems in a culture offering mixed messages.

Despite campaigns to raise awareness that drinking and riding don’t mix, the incentive to consume alcohol and ride a motorcycle has done anything but gone away.

Included in the allure is a sometimes quietly accepted, revenue-generating subculture enabling such behaviors as riding to the bar, or bar hopping, or participating in massive regional rider festivals where drink (and sometimes drugs) are plentiful.

Or, it could be simply individuals who ride after drinking for their own reasons.

To be fair, some more progressive and safety-minded motorcycle clubs have a rule that no alcohol may be consumed until the side stands are down for the night.

But even so, drinking and riding is more than a blip on the radar screen for transportation safety officials. About 46 percent of riders killed in accidents, according to the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF), have alcohol in their system at the time of their death.

Continue reading