Top 10 Riding Tips for Noobs | By: Troy Siahaan


This is a GREAT article not only for Noobs but for the rest of us who have been riding for years.  You can never forget what it was like to be a beginner and lose sight of these recommendations.  The difference between someone with riding experience under their belt is that all these tips become instinctual versus something you have to really focus and think about.  

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SOURCE: MOTORCYCLE.COM

Taking a certified motorcycle safety course is an important first step when learning to ride, but then what? Our 10 tips are things the MO staff has learned from our years of riding.

Motorcycling is a fun and exciting endeavor, but it has its dangers. From inattentive drivers to a little dirt in the road, there are countless scenarios that can present hazards, especially to less-experienced riders. As a new rider, possibly fresh out of the MSF course with a fresh motorcycle endorsement on your license, you should know the real world poses challenges you simply don’t experience in an empty parking lot.

The Motorcycle.com staff is full of highly experienced riders, but we were all beginners at some point. Over the years we have learned many tips and tricks that have helped us stay safe when we’re riding a motorcycle, so we decided to put together a list of things to keep in mind when you’re out riding. Most any rider will find kernels of wisdom here, but we’re focusing in on the “noob” segment to teach tactics that will help short-cut the learning process.

Notice the phrase “riding tips.” We’ll focus on things you can try while actually riding your motorcycle and assume you’re already wearing the best helmet and gear you can afford. Now, here are 10 riding tips we wish we knew when we were starting out.

Streetfighters
Riding in a group tempts some people to ride beyond their capabilities. Don’t be one of those people. Ride your own ride, at your own comfort level. Always.

The most important riding tip we can give you is to never, ever ride faster than your comfort limits, especially on public roads. Far too often we hear stories of lesser-experienced riders crashing while trying to keep pace with their faster buddies.

If you want to be able to ride faster, just creep up on your limits and pay attention to what your bike is telling you. Most likely it will say “I can go faster,” but you’ll want to avoid the surprise of when it says it can’t. Continue reading