It’s not getting any easier…


MiserySubheds

Dear Blog…my journal about everything.  Since January 30th 2014 I have been consumed with the hurt that comes with a separation of a relationship I thought was supposed to be forever.  As our legal issues get closer to a close, I can’t help to but feel even sadder.  Time certainly has past by, I am hesitant to even talk about my separation to anyone because it feels so old news.  I feel at this point I am becoming a burden on others and I can sort of tell.  Even when I reach out…at times specifically ask to talk I no longer have the few who used to respond.  Continue reading

Partnering with Revzilla


Revzilla is an online motorcycle everything you could dream of site that we have now partnered with on our blog.  If you look to the right on any page you will see a Revzilla widget.  Feel free to click the “ad” if you want to peruse their site and make a purchase.  This is our little way to try to recoup some costs associated with running a blog like this. 

Screen Shot 2014-01-10 at 3.22.20 AMI did not know this…someone made this comment…so, if you call in an order outside this blog and tell them about me, it would help…thanks again. Leslie

The reason I am writing to you, I ordered my first item from Revzilla.  I asked them if I could get you the credit for linking me to them and they said yes.  Since I travel, I am not able to use online, as my shipping address is always changing, so I call them direct.  So, you might share to your followers, that you can get credit at Revzilla, by just telling the order taker, that you were linked/referred to them by; Advgrrl.  They have you on file there and are happy to give you that credit.

 

Great customer service, no restocking fees, 1st return free…and if you call or email Revzilla you get advise from guys and gals who ride.  No strings attached, simply click the widget on our BLOG and shop away.  You might see more companies on this site which would only be companies we have dealt with and can 100% agree they are the best at what they do.  In the end, this is something I thought would help this blog grow and get even better for the future having some sort of infusion of cash.  When you buy through our site we do get a commission.  Just being open and transparent here.  Not a bad thing if you need gear and stuff and inadvertently support us too.  Thanks and happy shopping.

WOW-#213 Country to visit my blog is Cuba Population: 11,061,886


  Just really surprised to see a visitor from Cuba…happy surprise! 
 History
The native Amerindian population of Cuba began to decline after the European discovery of the island by Christopher COLUMBUS in 1492 and following its development as a Spanish colony during the next several centuries. Large numbers of African slaves were imported to work the coffee and sugar plantations, and Havana became the launching point for the annual treasure fleets bound for Spain from Mexico and Peru. Spanish rule eventually provoked an independence movement and occasional rebellions that were harshly suppressed. US intervention during the Spanish-American War in 1898 assisted the Cubans in overthrowing Spanish rule. The Treaty of Paris established Cuban independence from the US in 1902 after which the island experienced a string of governments mostly dominated by the military and corrupt politicians. Fidel CASTRO led a rebel army to victory in 1959; his iron rule held the subsequent regime together for nearly five decades. He stepped down as president in February 2008 in favor of his younger brother Raul CASTRO. Cuba’s communist revolution, with Soviet support, was exported throughout Latin America and Africa during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The country faced a severe economic downturn in 1990 following the withdrawal of former Soviet subsidies worth $4 billion to $6 billion annually. Cuba at times portrays the US embargo, in place since 1961, as the source if its difficulties. Illicit migration to the US – using homemade rafts, alien smugglers, air flights, or via the US’s southwest border – is a continuing problem. The US Coast Guard interdicted 1,275 Cuban nationals attempting to cross the Straits of Florida in 2012.

Continue reading

Do we need more Big bikes or smaller/lighter ADV DS tourers?


2015 KTM 1290 Super Adventure | FIRST LOOK

KTM confirms that they will add 1290 power to its Adventure lineup for the 2015 model year.

  • KTM has confirmed rumors that it will repurpose its stunning, 1,301cc Super Duke R powerplant for a new adventure touring machine, dubbed the “1290 Super Adventure.” Good news for anyone not satisfied with the current 1190’s straight-line performance, and likely bad news for every other manufacturer. This new ADV will combine the already successful 1190 Adventure platform with the V-twin from its flagship naked bike, and according to KTM will add a list of unique new features.


    Want to see our latest ADV action feature? CLICK HERE for our August issue cover story “Down & Dirty” and see how the 1190 Adventure R fared in our 2014 off-road MC Comparo.


    We anticipate an updated suite of electronics, including traction control, KTM’s lean-angle ABS, and electronically adjustable suspension. Word is the Super Adventure will share space in the stable with the current 1190 Adventure and 1190 Adventure R, at least initially. Expect the 1290 Super Adventure to make a public appearance at the Intermot motorcycle show in Cologne in early October, and land on US shores sometime in early 2015.

    Valdez to Chitina (397 KM)


    advgrrl:

    if you are in Alaska now or going don’t forget to ride this road

    Originally posted on Leslie's Motorcycle Adventures by Advgrrl:

    July 27th 2011

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (132)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (133)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (134)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (135)

    Ms. Peggy at the Salmon Hatchery. She wanted one of us to get in the picture with her, but Leslie was holding the camera and Cheryl was a wee bit tentative of her!

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (1)

    Ton’s or REDS (Sockeye), have arrived this season but no bears for us to see, only one or two sea otters, no sea lions and only 3 Bald Eagles. The tide was coming in and I guess if we waited longer we might have been able to catch a bear or two but we had to get going.

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (3)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (4)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (5)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (6)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (7)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (9)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (10)

    Cheryl July 27 11 (15)

    Cheryl July 27 11 (12)

    Fancy outhouses at the Hatchery

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (13)

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (15)

    The ride through the Thompson Pass to get to the interior was beautiful. Nice twisty roads, views to die for as usual and great weather.

    July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (16)

    Waterfalls are a dime a dozen up here. All coming down from the 100’s if not thousands of glaciers Alaska has to offer. Glaciers are everywhere.

    View original 1,159 more words

    Drive Chain Maintenance | DRIVE TIME


    I use an old tooth-brush to help with my cleaning of the chain…at times I do wish I had a shaft.  I upgraded recently as I did on my BMW F650GS to a DID gold chain and this helps with corrosion especially in my area where I live and seems to last longer than the BMW OEM chain.  I also like the master link idea rather than the continuous link.  Like the fact this article highlights that the chain doesn’t actually stretch….”. (Chains don’t actually stretch; their internal clearances just get bigger.)”

    The Missing Links of Chain Maintenance

    SOURCE: Motorcyclist

     

    Throughout motorcycling’s evolution toward more sophisticated technology, one feature of the earliest motorcycles still hangs in there like a vestigial tail––the drive chain. Simple––if not downright crude––yet efficient, it’s essentially a long string of machined bearing surfaces that lives in a harsh wilderness of water, dirt, infrequent adjustment, and insufficient lubrication. Beneath its often greasy exterior lie vital clues to ensuring its survival and longevity.

    Virtually all drive chains for street bikes, dirt bikes, and ATVs use some sort of flexible ring to seal grease in the gap between the pin and the bushing, where the load on the chain is highest. The first such seals were called O-rings because their cross-section is round, but now some chain manufacturers use rings whose cross-section resembles an X or a Z. When a solid O-ring is compressed between the side plates it puts pressure on the chain joint, and can wear into the side plate over time. X- and Z-rings bend or twist when they’re installed between the side plates, so they put less pressure on the joint, wear more slowly, and seal better.

    If the sealing ring breaks, the grease leaks out and that particular joint heats up, dries out, and becomes contaminated with water and rust, elongating the pin-to-bushing fit. (Chains don’t actually stretch; their internal clearances just get bigger.) This puts more load on the adjacent joints, and on the sprocket teeth. Sealing rings rarely break, but if they do, you should consider your chain toast; it’s time for a new one.

    Cleaning your chain

    Cleaning your chain doesn’t have to be a messy job. There are numerous cleaning tools available to make the process quicker, easier, and cleaner.

    Savvy maintenance is the key to chain survival. Never clean a chain with a wire brush. Instead use a commercial chain brush (or worn-out toothbrush) to gently remove dirt from the space between the side plates and around the sealing ring. Use kerosene as a solvent, or an all-surface cleaning product like Simple Green, or a dedicated chain-cleaning solution approved for O-ring chains. Never use gasoline. (In a pinch, you can employ WD-40 as a cleaning solvent, but it’s more expensive than using kerosene.) And don’t even think about cleaning the goo off your chain with the high-pressure hose at the car wash. A strong stream of water will blow right past the sealing ring and force out the grease.

    The grease behind the sealing ring is meant to last the life of the chain, but you still need to lubricate the chain rollers, which contact the sprocket teeth, and the sealing rings themselves, which can otherwise dry out and crack. Apply lube into the tiny gap on either side of the roller so it penetrates into the space between the roller and the outside of the bushing, then hit the sealing rings on either side of the chain. Do this when the chain is warm so the lube penetrates under the rollers thoroughly and spreads over the sealing rings. Wipe off the excess lube to keep dirt and grit from sticking to the chain. The chain should feel slightly oily to the touch, but not wet.

    How often to lube a chain depends on how and where you ride. Every other tank of gas should work for streetbikes; more often for, say, dual-sports ridden off-road. Aerosol chain lube is the most convenient, and the most common. It consists of lubricant in a solvent that thins it out so it penetrates more easily. The solvent quickly evaporates leaving behind a thicker lubricant that’s more of a grease than an oil. But word around the back door of the shop is that regular 80-weight gear oil will do fine. In emergencies you can even transfer oil from your engine’s oil-filler hole to the chain using a screwdriver––just don’t drop it in the crankcase. (That’s the sound of your friends with shaft-drive bikes chuckling.)

    Check the chain for slack every time you lube it, and adjust it on an as-needed basis. Some manuals say to do this with the bike on the sidestand, others on the centerstand. If you don’t have the manual, use this racer’s trick: Compress the rear suspension until the rear axle, the swingarm pivot, and the countershaft are lined up. Adjust the chain so there’s 10-15mm slack, then release the suspension and check the slack again. That’s the figure to shoot for next time you adjust the chain with the bike on the stand. Just make sure you use the same stand every time.

     

    Why I Ride Episode 2


    Our 2nd video in the series features an adventurous Harley Davidson rider Leslie Padoll, living in Brooklyn, NY. Check out the full site at esurance.com/whyiride

    Music:
    agentsdelfuturo.com

    Artist: The Sam Chase
    Song: Thank God
    Album: The Sam Chase Will Lead Us To Victory
    thesamchase.bandcamp.com/album/will-lead-us-to-victory