Partnering with Revzilla


Revzilla is an online motorcycle everything you could dream of site that we have now partnered with on our blog.  If you look to the right on any page you will see a Revzilla widget.  Feel free to click the “ad” if you want to peruse their site and make a purchase.  This is our little way to try to recoup some costs associated with running a blog like this. 

Screen Shot 2014-01-10 at 3.22.20 AMI did not know this…someone made this comment…so, if you call in an order outside this blog and tell them about me, it would help…thanks again. Leslie

The reason I am writing to you, I ordered my first item from Revzilla.  I asked them if I could get you the credit for linking me to them and they said yes.  Since I travel, I am not able to use online, as my shipping address is always changing, so I call them direct.  So, you might share to your followers, that you can get credit at Revzilla, by just telling the order taker, that you were linked/referred to them by; Advgrrl.  They have you on file there and are happy to give you that credit.

 

Great customer service, no restocking fees, 1st return free…and if you call or email Revzilla you get advise from guys and gals who ride.  No strings attached, simply click the widget on our BLOG and shop away.  You might see more companies on this site which would only be companies we have dealt with and can 100% agree they are the best at what they do.  In the end, this is something I thought would help this blog grow and get even better for the future having some sort of infusion of cash.  When you buy through our site we do get a commission.  Just being open and transparent here.  Not a bad thing if you need gear and stuff and inadvertently support us too.  Thanks and happy shopping.

Valdez to Chitina (397 KM)


advgrrl:

if you are in Alaska now or going don’t forget to ride this road

Originally posted on Leslie's Motorcycle Adventures by Advgrrl:

July 27th 2011

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (132)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (133)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (134)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (135)

Ms. Peggy at the Salmon Hatchery. She wanted one of us to get in the picture with her, but Leslie was holding the camera and Cheryl was a wee bit tentative of her!

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (1)

Ton’s or REDS (Sockeye), have arrived this season but no bears for us to see, only one or two sea otters, no sea lions and only 3 Bald Eagles. The tide was coming in and I guess if we waited longer we might have been able to catch a bear or two but we had to get going.

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (3)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (4)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (5)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (6)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (7)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (9)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (10)

Cheryl July 27 11 (15)

Cheryl July 27 11 (12)

Fancy outhouses at the Hatchery

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (13)

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (15)

The ride through the Thompson Pass to get to the interior was beautiful. Nice twisty roads, views to die for as usual and great weather.

July 27 11 Valdez to Chitina (16)

Waterfalls are a dime a dozen up here. All coming down from the 100’s if not thousands of glaciers Alaska has to offer. Glaciers are everywhere.

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Drive Chain Maintenance | DRIVE TIME


I use an old tooth-brush to help with my cleaning of the chain…at times I do wish I had a shaft.  I upgraded recently as I did on my BMW F650GS to a DID gold chain and this helps with corrosion especially in my area where I live and seems to last longer than the BMW OEM chain.  I also like the master link idea rather than the continuous link.  Like the fact this article highlights that the chain doesn’t actually stretch….”. (Chains don’t actually stretch; their internal clearances just get bigger.)”

The Missing Links of Chain Maintenance

SOURCE: Motorcyclist

 

Throughout motorcycling’s evolution toward more sophisticated technology, one feature of the earliest motorcycles still hangs in there like a vestigial tail––the drive chain. Simple––if not downright crude––yet efficient, it’s essentially a long string of machined bearing surfaces that lives in a harsh wilderness of water, dirt, infrequent adjustment, and insufficient lubrication. Beneath its often greasy exterior lie vital clues to ensuring its survival and longevity.

Virtually all drive chains for street bikes, dirt bikes, and ATVs use some sort of flexible ring to seal grease in the gap between the pin and the bushing, where the load on the chain is highest. The first such seals were called O-rings because their cross-section is round, but now some chain manufacturers use rings whose cross-section resembles an X or a Z. When a solid O-ring is compressed between the side plates it puts pressure on the chain joint, and can wear into the side plate over time. X- and Z-rings bend or twist when they’re installed between the side plates, so they put less pressure on the joint, wear more slowly, and seal better.

If the sealing ring breaks, the grease leaks out and that particular joint heats up, dries out, and becomes contaminated with water and rust, elongating the pin-to-bushing fit. (Chains don’t actually stretch; their internal clearances just get bigger.) This puts more load on the adjacent joints, and on the sprocket teeth. Sealing rings rarely break, but if they do, you should consider your chain toast; it’s time for a new one.

Cleaning your chain

Cleaning your chain doesn’t have to be a messy job. There are numerous cleaning tools available to make the process quicker, easier, and cleaner.

Savvy maintenance is the key to chain survival. Never clean a chain with a wire brush. Instead use a commercial chain brush (or worn-out toothbrush) to gently remove dirt from the space between the side plates and around the sealing ring. Use kerosene as a solvent, or an all-surface cleaning product like Simple Green, or a dedicated chain-cleaning solution approved for O-ring chains. Never use gasoline. (In a pinch, you can employ WD-40 as a cleaning solvent, but it’s more expensive than using kerosene.) And don’t even think about cleaning the goo off your chain with the high-pressure hose at the car wash. A strong stream of water will blow right past the sealing ring and force out the grease.

The grease behind the sealing ring is meant to last the life of the chain, but you still need to lubricate the chain rollers, which contact the sprocket teeth, and the sealing rings themselves, which can otherwise dry out and crack. Apply lube into the tiny gap on either side of the roller so it penetrates into the space between the roller and the outside of the bushing, then hit the sealing rings on either side of the chain. Do this when the chain is warm so the lube penetrates under the rollers thoroughly and spreads over the sealing rings. Wipe off the excess lube to keep dirt and grit from sticking to the chain. The chain should feel slightly oily to the touch, but not wet.

How often to lube a chain depends on how and where you ride. Every other tank of gas should work for streetbikes; more often for, say, dual-sports ridden off-road. Aerosol chain lube is the most convenient, and the most common. It consists of lubricant in a solvent that thins it out so it penetrates more easily. The solvent quickly evaporates leaving behind a thicker lubricant that’s more of a grease than an oil. But word around the back door of the shop is that regular 80-weight gear oil will do fine. In emergencies you can even transfer oil from your engine’s oil-filler hole to the chain using a screwdriver––just don’t drop it in the crankcase. (That’s the sound of your friends with shaft-drive bikes chuckling.)

Check the chain for slack every time you lube it, and adjust it on an as-needed basis. Some manuals say to do this with the bike on the sidestand, others on the centerstand. If you don’t have the manual, use this racer’s trick: Compress the rear suspension until the rear axle, the swingarm pivot, and the countershaft are lined up. Adjust the chain so there’s 10-15mm slack, then release the suspension and check the slack again. That’s the figure to shoot for next time you adjust the chain with the bike on the stand. Just make sure you use the same stand every time.

 

Why I Ride Episode 2


Our 2nd video in the series features an adventurous Harley Davidson rider Leslie Padoll, living in Brooklyn, NY. Check out the full site at esurance.com/whyiride

Music:
agentsdelfuturo.com

Artist: The Sam Chase
Song: Thank God
Album: The Sam Chase Will Lead Us To Victory
thesamchase.bandcamp.com/album/will-lead-us-to-victory

212th Country to Visit My Blog – Equatorial Guinea Population: 704,001


thank you Equatorial Guinea!  
 History
Equatorial Guinea gained independence in 1968 after 190 years of Spanish rule. This tiny country, composed of a mainland portion plus five inhabited islands, is one of the smallest on the African continent. President Teodoro OBIANG NGUEMA MBASOGO has ruled the country since 1979 when he seized power in a coup. Although nominally a constitutional democracy since 1991, the 1996, 2002, and 2009 presidential elections – as well as the 1999, 2004, and 2008 legislative elections – were widely seen as flawed. The president exerts almost total control over the political system and has discouraged political opposition. Equatorial Guinea has experienced rapid economic growth due to the discovery of large offshore oil reserves, and in the last decade has become Sub-Saharan Africa’s third largest oil exporter. Despite the country’s economic windfall from oil production, resulting in a massive increase in government revenue in recent years, improvements in the population’s living standards have been slow to develop.

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BMW Motorrad model facelift measures for model year 2015. Special model K 1300 S Motorsport.


  • 04.07.2014
BMW K 1300 S Motorsport, Black storm metallic, Light white, Lupine blue metallic (07/2014) Show all media

Munich. Model year 2015 sees a number of model facelift measures as well as the special model K 1300 S Motorsport included in the BMW Motorrad program. The models can be ordered from all
BMW Motorrad dealers in the new configuration from August 2014.

BMW F 700 GS.

As of model year 2015, the BMW F 700 GS will also be available in the following new paint finishes or paint finish combinations:

  • Alpine white
  • Black storm metallic/ Racing red / frame finished in red / spring of the spring strut finished in red (standard)
  • Racing blue metallic matt

The previous paint finishes Red apple metallic, Ostra grey metallic matt and Glacier silver metallic are no longer available.

BMW F 800 GS.

As of model year 2015, the BMW F 800 GS will also be available in the following new paint finishes or paint finish combinations:

  • Light white / Black storm metallic / frame finished in red / spring of the spring strut finished in red (standard)
  • Racing red

The paint finish Alpine white 3 remains in the program. The previous paint finishes Cordoba blue and Kalamata metallic matt are no longer available.

BMW F 800 GS Adventure.

As of model year 2015, the BMW F 800 GS Adventure will also be available in the following new paint finishes:

  • Alpine white 3
  • Kalamata metallic matt

The previous paint finishes Racing red and Sandrover matt are no longer available.

BMW F 800 GT.

As of model year 2015, the BMW F 800 GT will be available in the following new paint finish:

  • Montego blue metallic

The paint finishes Dark graphite metallic and Light white remain in the program, the paint finish Valencia orange metallic is no longer available.

BMW R 1200 GS.

As of model year 2015, the R 1200 GS will not just be available with new paint finishes. With a view to enhanced running smoothness, it will also be fitted with a crankshaft with increased gyrating masses as in the R 1200 GS Adventure and R 1200 RT. In addition, the R 1200 GS can also be fitted with the BMW Motorrad Keyless Ride System as an ex-works option. This enables both the steering lock and the fuel filler flap to be locked and unlocked. The motorcycle is started using the starter button as before. With Keyless Ride, the key can always remain in the rider’s clothing. The Shift Assistant Pro available as an option ex works allows the rider to shift up without clutch, enabling acceleration virtually without torque interrupt. It also allows downshifting without using the clutch.

 

An overview of the new features in the R 1200 GS:

  • Increased gyrating masses in the crankshaft
  • Shift Assistant Pro (option)
  • Keyless Ride (option
  • New paint finish Alpine white in conjunction with drive and suspension components in black
  • New paint finish Frozen dark blue metallic
  • New paint finish Black storm metallic

Of the previous paint finishes, Thunder grey metallic and Bluefire are no longer available.

BMW R 1200 GS Adventure.

As of model year 2015, the R 1200 GS Adventure will also comprise new features which make handling the ultimate long-distance travel enduro even more dynamic and comfortable. For example, it can be fitted with the BMW Motorrad Keyless Ride System as an ex-works option. This enables both the steering lock and the fuel filler flap to be locked and unlocked. The motorcycle is started using the starter button as before. With Keyless Ride, the key can always remain in the rider’s clothing. The Shift Assistant Pro available as an option ex works allows the rider to shift up without clutch, enabling acceleration virtually without torque interrupt. It also allows downshifting without using the clutch. As an option ex works, the
R 1200 GS Adventure can now also be fitted with a lowered suspension. In conjunction with a reduction in seat height by 50 millimetres to 860/840 millimetres, the R 1200 GS Adventure is now also within reach of customers for whom the previous seat height posed an insurmountable obstacle. If a further reduction in seat height is required, the R 1200 GS Adventure can also be fitted with the seats of the R 1200 GS. This reduces seat height by an additional 20 millimetres.

An overview of the new features in the R 1200 GS Adventure:

  • Suspension lowered by 50 millimetres (option)
  • Low seats from the R 1200 GS (option)
  • Shift Assistant Pro (option)
  • Keyless Ride (option)

 

BMW R 1200 RT.

As of model year 2015, the R 1200 RT will be supplied in a new two-colour paint finish and can also be fitted with the BMW Motorrad Keyless Ride System as an ex-works option. This enables the steering lock, fuel tank can and storage compartments to be locked and unlocked without using a key. The motorcycle is started using the starter button as before. With Keyless Ride, the key can always remain in the rider’s clothing.

An overview of the new features in the R 1200 RT:

  • Keyless Ride (option)
  • New two-colour paint finish San Marino blue metallic/ Granite grey metallic matt

Of the previous paint finishes, Quartz blue metallic is no longer available.

 

BMW K 1600 GT and GTL.

The BMW luxury touring bikes K 1600 GT and GTL will be supplied in new paint finishes as of model year 2015. What is more, the two model variants now benefit from Dynamic Traction Control (DTC) as standard for increased safety when accelerating. In addition, the K 1600 GT/ GTL can also be fitted with the BMW Motorrad Keyless Ride System as an ex-works option (already included in the fittings of the K 1600 GTL Exclusive). This enables the steering lock, fuel tank can and storage compartments to be locked and unlocked without using a key. The motorcycle is started using the starter button as before. With Keyless Ride, the key can always remain in the rider’s clothing.

Other new special equipment features for the K 1600 GT/ GTL include daytime riding light and Hill Start Control for easy hill starts. The K 1600 GT and GTL are now also fitted with the instrument panel of the
K 1600 GTL Exclusive featuring new scales and particularly high-end chrome surfaces.

An overview of the new features in the K 1600 GT/ GTL:

  • Dynamic Traction Control DTC
  • Keyless Ride (option)
  • Daytime riding light (option)
  • Hill Start Control (option)
  • Safety package without DTC, including daytime riding light and Hill Start Control (option)
  • Instruments with new scales and chrome surfaces
  • New paint finish Black storm metallic (GT and GTL)
  • New paint finish Glacier silver metallic (GTL)
  • New paint finish Light white (GT)

Of the previous paint finishes, Dark graphite metallic (GT and GTL), Damask red metallic (GTL) and Montego blue metallic (GT) are no longer available.

Special model BMW K 1300 S Motorsport.

Sporty touring combined with long-distance qualities and comfort as well as supreme riding dynamics and safety – these have been the outstanding strengths of the BMW K 1300 S for years. With the exclusive special model
K 1300 S Motorsport, BMW Motorrad now deliberately emphasises the dynamic character of this popular sports touring bike.

Fitted as standard with ABS like all BMW motorcycles, the BMW K 1300 S Motorsport highlights its athletic flair with a new colour concept in the BMW Motorsport colours Black storm metallic, Light white and Lupine blue metallic, combined with red decorative stripes. The black engine spoiler and the tinted windshield provide a fascinating contrast.

Reflecting its sporting aspirations, the K 1300 S is also fitted with HP wheels for optimised handling, an Akrapovic rear silencer and HP footrests for rider and passenger.

 

The highlights of the BMW K 1300 S Motorsport:

  • BMW Motorsport paint finish in Black storm metallic, Light white and Lupine blue metallic.
  • Windshield, tinted.
  • HP footrests for rider and passenger.
  • HP wheels.
  • Akrapovic rear silencer.

The previous paint finishes Titanium silver metallic/ Sapphire black metallic and Racing red / Sapphire black metallic/ Alpine white 3 are no longer available.

The market launch of the BMW K 1300 S Motorsport will be on August 1st 2014 at a price of € 19,950 incl. 19% VAT.

BMW K 1300 R.

As of model year 2015, the BMW K 1300 R will be available in the following paint finish:

  • Sapphire black metallic/ Black satin gloss

The previous paint finish Racing red / Sapphire lack metallic is no longer available.

 

BMW C evolution.

For increased comfort, the innovative electrically powered scooter BMW C evolution can be fitted with a comfort seat (option) as of model year 2015. This is also available as a special accessory for retrofitting.

 

Keyless Ride new for R 1200 GS / GS Adventure, R 1200 RT and
K 1600 GT / GTL for maximum user-friendliness.

For the first time, the BMW Motorrad Keyless Ride System now optionally replaces the conventional ignition lock in the R 1200 GS / GS Adventure, the R 1200 RT and the K 1600 GT / GTL. This means that it is no longer necessary to use a regular key. Unlocking and locking of the steering lock, ignition, fuel filler flap and storage compartments (R 1200 RT and K 1600 GT / GTL) is carried out using a transponder integrated in the key. The key can therefore remain in the rider’s clothes, for example.

As soon as the key is located within the vehicle reception area (distance < 2 metres), the steering lock can be briefly unlocked after successful authentication by briefly pressing the button. The steering lock is locked by keeping the button pressed down and placing the handlebars in end position. The ignition is activated by briefly pressing the button or keeping the button pressed down after releasing the steering lock. The ignition is switched off by means of a short or long press of the button. To open the fuel tank, the lever of the fuel filler flap is simply raised. The fuel filler flap can be opened when the motorcycle has been electrically unlocked. The fuel tank is closed by simply pressing the fuel filler flap shut. The alarm system (DWA) is automatically activated when the ignition is switched off and the steering lock is closed, as soon as the key leaves the reception area. However, the alarm system can also be activated manually.

Shift Assistant Pro for gear shifts virtually without torque interrupt as a new special equipment feature for the R 1200 GS / GS Adventure.

The Shift Assistant Pro enables the rider to shift up and down without activating the clutch or throttle valve in the relevant load and engine speed ranges, giving the rider additional comfort as well as increased dynamic performance. Most shifts can be carried out using the shift assistant; one exception here is setting off, for example.

When accelerating, the throttle valve no longer has to be closed for shifts, so propulsion power is virtually constant without torque interrupt. When decelerating and shifting down (throttle valve closed), the engine speed is automatically adapted by means of double-declutching. Gears are engaged as usual by means of the gear pedal. Shift time is significantly reduced as compared to a gearshift using the clutch. However, the Shift Assistant Pro is not an automatic transmission, it simply provides gear shift support. When the Shift Assistant Pro is used for gear shifts, the cruise control is deactivated for safety reasons.

You will find press material on BMW motorcycles and BMW Motorrad rider equipment in the BMW Group PressClub at www.press.bmwgroup.com.

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